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Should I Hire a Lawyer to Fight My Reckless Driving Speeding Ticket? (Part A)

In Virginia, some traffic offenses are considered a serious crime. For instance, exceeding a speed of 80 mph, or exceeding the speed limit by 20 mph, can mean a charge of reckless driving/speeding. As a class 1 misdemeanor, a reckless driving speeding conviction will leave you with a permanent criminal record.

Not only does this come with legal penalties such as fines and license suspensions, but it can prevent you from getting a job you wanted, and may even land you in jail.
  

But there is always the option of fighting a Virginia reckless driving/speeding ticket. By beating your charge, you can avoid the heavy penalties and fines. To fight the charge you can get the help of a Virginia reckless driving attorney. 

Consequences You'll Want to Avoid

The consequences of a reckless driving speeding conviction can turn your life upside down. Besides the impact it can have on your finances, you can lose your driver's license altogether. This will prevent you from leading your life as you did before the conviction. You will no longer have the convenience and freedom to drive wherever you please.

You may also be penalized with fines, points on your driving record, and increased insurance rates
. And if your speed exceeded 90 mph then you may face time in jail. According to a formula that some judges use, you can face 2 days behind bars for every 1 mph over 90 mph. And if your speed exceeded 100 mph, you may serve an additional 30 days.

But with the help of a Virginia reckless driving attorney, you may escape a damaging conviction. Learn more about fighting your Virginia reckless driving charge in the second part of our article.

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Bob Battle
100% of my practice is devoted to serious traffic defense and criminal litigation in state and federal courts